Browse Projects

Students focus upon a fundamental question in cancer biology – “Why do normal cells get it right every time they divide, and why do cancer cells get it wrong every time they divide?”. Students identify a DNA-protective gene in the eukaryotic model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Students will study how mutations in this gene contribute to genome instability.
Student Audience:
Introductory, Major
Scientific Domain:
Biochemistry, Genetics/Genomics, Microbiology, Molecular and cellular biology
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research, Informatics/computational research, Basic research
Students the Riverside State Park natural area and are introduced to the patterns of diversity and complexity of plant and animal communities. In small groups, students develop a research question related to their observations that is answerable over the course of a short period of time. Students develop and complete their project and then present results and conclusions to the class.
Student Audience:
Introductory, Major
Scientific Domain:
Ecology
Nature of the Research:
Field research
Student Audience:
Introductory, Major
Scientific Domain:
Chemistry (General)
Nature of the Research:
Basic research
Students enrolled in BIOL 370 General Microbiology at Gonzaga University spend 1/2 of their laboratory time engaged in faculty guided independent research in microbiology.
Student Audience:
Major
Scientific Domain:
Microbiology
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research, Field research, Basic research
Students work with DNA from a novel bacteriophage they discovered in a previous course. Students learn how to capture and clone fragments of DNA and discover the DNA sequence of those clones and what is most closely related to them. Finally, using the first two projects as inspiration, students will come up with a genetics-based question to answer using recently mastered skills.
Student Audience:
Advanced, Major
Scientific Domain:
Bioinformatics/Computational biology, Genetics/Genomics, Molecular and cellular biology
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research, Informatics/computational research, Basic research, Database research
Students measure gene expression at the mRNA level of metabolic enzymes in response to different carbon sources to understand gene regulation and function using qRT-PCR and common molecular techniques of nucleic acid isolation.
Student Audience:
Advanced, Major
Scientific Domain:
Microbiology, Molecular and cellular biology
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research, Basic research
Students will be immersed in authentic research for one semester developing critical thinking skills and analytical reasoning skills needed by biomedical research scientists.
Student Audience:
Advanced, Major
Scientific Domain:
Biochemistry, Bioinformatics/Computational biology, Chemistry (Organic), Genetics/Genomics, Microbiology, Molecular and cellular biology, Physiology
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research, Informatics/computational research, Basic research, Translational research, Database research
A study of the morphology and physiology of cells and cell organelles; diversity of cell types resulting from cell specialization; mechanisms by which cells reproduce, develop, and evolve; methodology by which cell physiology and morphology are studied in laboratory featuring student-developed authentic research.
Student Audience:
Introductory, Major
Scientific Domain:
Biochemistry, Chemistry (Organic), Genetics/Genomics, Microbiology, Molecular and cellular biology
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research, Basic research
This is an investigative-based research lab that will generate real scientific data. Students will discover, isolate, and purify new bacteriophages from the environment. Students will obtain microscopic images of their phage as well as isolate the DNA and begin to characterize it on a molecular level. Along the way, students will learn what it is like to be a part of a scientific research group,
Student Audience:
Introductory
Scientific Domain:
Microbiology, Molecular and cellular biology
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research, Basic research
Students in an Organic II lab (13 weeks, 3 hours per week) worked in pairs to isolate the natural products neurolenin B and D, potential treatments for lymphatic filariasis. They proposed reactions to modify these molecules using literature precedent then ran the reactions and analyzed the products. Results were presented in journal article and poster formats.
Student Audience:
Introductory
Scientific Domain:
Chemistry (Organic)
Nature of the Research:
Wet lab/bench research

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