MCC: Malate Dehydrogenase CUREs Community

Project Location

CA
US
The Malate Dehydrogenase CUREs Community (MCC) project involves protein-centric, CUREs focusing on a variety of research areas related to Malate Dehydrogenase including mechanisms of catalysis and regulation, adaptation and evolution, cofactor specificity, folding and stability and interactions in metabolons, suitable for introductory to advanced level courses in diverse institutions.

Student Audience

Introductory, Advanced, Major, Non-major

Scientific Domain

  • Biochemistry

Nature of the Research

  • Wet lab/bench research
  • Informatics/computational research
  • Basic research

Core Concepts

  • Evolution: The diversity of life evolved over time by process of mutation, selection, and genetic change.
  • Structure and Function: Basic units of structure define the function of all living things.

Core Competencies

  • Applying the process of science
  • Using quantitative reasoning
  • Tapping into the interdisciplinary nature of science
  • Communicating and collaborating

Guiding Questions

  • How does protein structure govern enzyme catalysis?
  • How is the activity of an enzyme regulated?
  • How do noncovalent interactions govern substrate specificity?
  • How does a protein adapt to environmental conditions?
  • How do enzymes interact to facilitate metabolism?

Learning Objectives

  • Access and Assess the primary literature
  • Develop a Hypothesis based upon prior information
  • Design and Conduct experiments to test their hypothesis: Lab Skills
  • Analyze and interpret data
  • Present their project and conclusions in various ways

Overview

The Malate Dehydrogenase CUREs Community (MCC) project is designed to facilitate the adoption of effective, protein-centric, Course Based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) into teaching labs at a wide variety of undergraduate serving institutions. (Primarily Undergraduate Institutions, Research Intensive Universities and Community Colleges) MCC coordinates and conducts pedagogical research into two major features of CUREs:1) their duration (whole semester versus 5-6 week modules incorporated into a lab class), and 2) the impact of scientific collaboration between institutions (a key aspect of much modern research). Using validated assessment tools we seek to establish their effects on student confidence, persistence in STEM, and ability to design research experiments and interprete data. To facilitate faculty adoption of CURE approaches the project provides a number of resources. These focus on a variety of research areas related to Malate Dehydrogenase including mechanisms of catalysis and regulation, adaptation and evolution, cofactor specificity, folding and stability and interactions in metabolons. Resources include biologics, experimental protocols and assessment tools. The project also coordinates interactions between courses at different institutions to allow incorporation of scientific collaboration into CUREs. These collaborations also facilitate the use of more sophisticated experimental approaches and broaden the experimental scope of the CUREs.

 

Currently the project is coordinating incorporation of MCC into courses at the following institutions:

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Jing Zhang: jzhang24@unl.edu)
University of Massachuesetts: Amherst (Amy Springer: aspringer@biochem.umass.edu)
North Hennepin Community College (Tamara Mans: TMans@nhcc.edu)
SouthWest Community College (David Hecht: Dhecht@swccd.edu)
West Virginia University (Laura Christian: Laura.Christian@mail.wvu.edu)
Mercyhurst College (Amy Parente: aparente@mercyhurst.edu)
Suffolk University (Celeste Peterson: cnpeterson@suffolk.edu)
Union College (Kristin Fox: foxk@union.edu)
St John Fisher College (Kevin Callahan: kcallahan@sjfc.edu)
Marshall University (John Rakus: rakus@marshall.edu)
Malone University (Katie Huisinga: khuisinga@malone.edu)
University of San Diego (Anthony Bell: anthonybell@sandiego.edu, Jessica Bell: jessicabell@sandiego.edu, Joseph Provost: josephprovost@sandiego.edu, & Ellis Bell: jbell@sandiego.edu )

 

Participating faculty at these institutions all use the same assessment tools and are coordinating activities to provide assessment data that will address our two pedagogical questions. Faculty and student collaborations also lead to peer reviewed publication of research on Structure-Function Relationships on Malate Dehydrogenase.

 

If you are interested in joining the MCC project please contact Ellis Bell, email: jbell@sandiego.edu, Joseph Provost, email: josephprovost@sandiego.edu, or Jessica Bell, email: jessicabell@sandiego.edu at the University of San Diego

Student Resources

References

Using research to teach an "introduction to biological thinking". Bell E. Biochem Mol Biol Educ. 2011 Jan-Feb;39(1):10-6. doi: 10.1002/bmb.20441

Bringing the excitement and motivation of research to students; Using inquiry and research-based learning in a year-long biochemistry laboratory: Part I-guided inquiry-purification and characterization of a fusion protein: Histidine tag, malate dehydrogenase, and green fluorescent protein. Knutson K, Smith J, Wallert MA, Provost JJ. Biochem Mol Biol Edu

Bringing the excitement and motivation of research to students; Using inquiry and research-based learning in a year-long biochemistry laboratory : Part II-research-based laboratory-a semester-long research approach using malate dehydrogenase as a research model. Knutson K, Smith J, Nichols P, Wallert MA, Provost JJ. Biochem Mol Biol Educ. 2010 Sep;38(5)

CUREs in biochemistry-where we are and where we should go. Bell JK, Eckdahl TT, Hecht DA, Killion PJ, Latzer J, Mans TL, Provost JJ, Rakus JF, Siebrasse EA, Ellis Bell J. Biochem Mol Biol Educ. 2016 Jun 30. doi: 10.1002/bmb.20989

Organelle and translocatable forms of glyoxysomal malate dehydrogenase. The effect of the N-terminal presequence. Cox B, Chit MM, Weaver T, Gietl C, Bailey J, Bell E, Banaszak L. FEBS J. 2005 Feb;272(3):643-54.

Structural analyses of a malate dehydrogenase with a variable active site. Bell JK, Yennawar HP, Wright SK, Thompson JR, Viola RE, Banaszak LJ. J Biol Chem. 2001 Aug 17;276(33):31156-62.

Concomitant purification and characterization of malate dehydrogenase, aspartate transaminase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase and enolase from rabbit liver cytosol. Provost JJ, Ray PD, Lambeth DO. Prep Biochem Biotechnol. 1996 May;26(2):121-33.

Getting Started

Facilities necessary or available through collaboration are described for various levels of MCC CUREs on the project website

Preparation

1-2 Hours

Class time

4-14 3Hour Lab Periods per semester